Sport Stacking



Sport stacking (formerly known as cup stacking) is an individual and team activity played using plastic cups. It originated in the early 1980's in southern California and received national attention in 1990 on the "Tonight Show" with Johnny Carson.

Participants of sport stacking stack and unstack cups in pre-determined sequences, competing against the clock or another player. Sequences are usually pyramids of three, six or ten upside-down cups. Proponents of the sport say participants learn teamwork, cooperation, ambidexterity, and hand-eye coordination.

Tournaments are governed by the World Sport Stacking Association. In 2004, the Association changed the activity's name from cup stacking to sport stacking to give it "immediate identification as a competitive sport."

While sport stacking can be done with any cups, those produced by the Speed Stacks company are sanctioned by the World Sport Stacking Association for competition and therefore the most commonly used. Made of durable plastic, they have three holes in the bottom to allow air to pass through quickly when stacking the cups together and are designed so they can be quickly separated from each other when stacked.

Rules:

There are three main types of stacks in competition. All stacks can be made from left-to-right or right-to-left (individual preference), but the same direction must be maintained for both "up stacking" (setting the cups into pyramids) and "down stacking" (unstacking the pyramids and returning them to their nested position).

3 - 3 - 3

Uses 9 cups. Cups start upside-down in three nested stacks of 3. The stacker must create three pyramids of 3 upside-down cups each and then down stack the cups back into nested stacks of 3 in the order that they were upstacked.

3 - 6 - 3

Uses 12 cups. The stacker must create three pyramids made up of three cups on the left, six cups in the center, and three cups on the right (3-6-3), then down stack the cups in the order that they were upstacked into their original position.

The Cycle Stack

The most complicated stack is called the Cycle Stack. It involves a sequence which includes, in order: a 3-6-3 stack, a 6-6 stack, and a 1-10-1 stack, finishing in a down stacked 3-6-3.

Most sport stacking competitions are geared toward children, with divisions by year for ages 12 and under. For older stackers, the divisions are by age groups: 13-14, 15-18, 19-24 (Collegiate), 25-59 (Master), 60+ (Senior). There are also divisions for "Special Stackers".

Official timing is done with a StackMat, a special mat with an attached timer. Competitors must put their hands flat on the timer at the edge of the mat. As soon as they are given the signal from the judge, they may lift their hands and begin to stack; this action starts the timer. When finished with the stacking cycle, the competitor must again touch their hands to the mat timer to stop it. The timer is accurate to one-hundredth of a second.

In team relay, four-person teams compete head-to-head in a best-of-three-race match. In doubles, two stackers stand side-by-side to complete the stack, with one Stacker using only his or her right hand while the other using only his or her left.

The world record for the fastest cycle stack is 7.43 seconds, completed by Emily Fox from Denver, Colorado, whose feat is listed in the Guinness Book of Records.Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, with no Front-Cover Texts, and with no Back-Cover Texts.
Virtual Magic is a human knowledge database blog. Text Based On Information From Wikipedia, Under The GNU Free Documentation License. Copyright (c) 2007 Virtual Magic. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.1 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts and no Back-Cover Texts. A copy of the license is included in the section entitled "GNU Free Documentation License".

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