John Hutchison



John Hutchison is a Canadian autodidact known for his alleged discovery of a variety of purported natural (or paranormal) phenomena.

Hutchison apparently claims that in the 1980s he worked for the American and Canadian military, investigating various alleged phenomena. These have become known, perhaps satirically, as the Hutchison effect.

Even the most broad-minded scientists seem to doubt the reality of these phenomena. In a recent posting to sci.physics.research, Marc Millis, who formerly ran the now defunct Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Program for NASA, wrote:

The Hutchison Effect has been claimed for years, without any independent verification - ever. In fact, its originator can't even replicate it on demand. This has been investigated more than once, been part of documentaries on the discovery channel, but still never seems to pass critical muster. This is in the category of folklore. In general, the "American Antigravity" web site caters to such folklore and its enthusiasts.

— Marc G. Millis

Furthermore, the actual creator of his effect is in dispute, as Mel Winfield claims that it was solely through his theories that The Hutchison Effect came into being.

It has been said that researchers at NASA and the Max Planck Institute have attempted to reproduce some of Hutchison's experiments, but that so far none has succeeded. Indeed, Marc Millis remarks that Hutchison himself appears unable to reproduce his earlier alleged experiments. Hutchison allegedly retorts that this is due to the destruction of his lab by "military intelligence", or because he has been otherwise prevented by "the government" from repeating his experiments.

Hutchison apparently also claims to have invented over-unity batteries which he calls Q Cells or Hiroshima cells and which, he says, obtain energy from the vacuum using the Casimir effect. Mainstream physicists are quick to point out that over-unity is just another word for a perpetual-motion machine. They add that the Casimir effect, while a genuine physical effect, has often been invoked by people seeking an energetic "free-lunch", in defiance of the laws of thermodynamics.

Hutchison apparently also claims that his work "explains the technology behind UFOs", but mainstream physicists doubt that UFOs represent an engineering phenomenon at all.

Hutchison's claims have been described from time to time in various fringe newsletters. He has apparently been profiled in one or more documentaries aired on the The Discovery Channel, The Learning Channel, and Nippon Television.

Hutchison apparently claims that "at the end of the cold war" a "military intelligence service" (not otherwise specified) destroyed his lab in Vancouver while he was traveling in Europe. To support this bizarre allegation, Hutchison allegedly presented photos of letters allegedly written by various scientific and government organisations, as well as a letter allegedly written by Hans-Adam II, Prince of Liechtenstein. However, it is far from clear what relevance these letters, whose provenance is unverified, might have.Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, with no Front-Cover Texts, and with no Back-Cover Texts.
Virtual Magic is a human knowledge database blog. Text Based On Information From Wikipedia, Under The GNU Free Documentation License. Copyright (c) 2007 Virtual Magic. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.1 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts and no Back-Cover Texts. A copy of the license is included in the section entitled "GNU Free Documentation License".

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