CSI: Crime Scene Investigation



CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (commonly referred to as CSI) is a popular, Emmy Award-winning CBS television series that trails the investigations of a team of forensic scientists as they unveil the circumstances behind mysterious and unusual deaths and crimes committed. In addition to the original CSI program, which is set in Las Vegas, the franchise includes two spinoffs - one set in Miami (CSI: Miami) and another in New York City (CSI: NY). The show is produced in partnership with the Canadian media company Alliance Atlantis.

CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, along with CBS's hit franchise Survivor, was instrumental in CBS instantly becoming a major competitor on Thursday nights, as well as becoming the most-watched network on U.S. television. It was announced on December 19, 2000 that CBS was going to move CSI (from Fridays) and Survivor (from Wednesdays) to Thursday nights starting in February 2001 to challenge NBC's long-standing and popular Must See TV lineup, which included the hit shows, Friends and Will & Grace. As a result, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation was the most-watched program on television for the 2002-2003 TV season and has been in the top 3 of the most-watched TV programs every season since the 2001-2002 TV season. CBS has now become the most-watched network on Thursday nights due to the departure of NBC's Friends in 2004, ER's gradual decline in viewer numbers for NBC, and the emergence of another popular CBS crime drama, Without a Trace, from the fall of 2002 until it was moved to Sunday nights in the fall of 2006.

The 2004-2005 season finale, directed by Quentin Tarantino and entitled Grave Danger, was watched by over 40 million viewers on May 19, 2005.

The show averages 30 million viewers every week and as of February 2006, CBS reported that over 90 million viewers have tuned into the series this past year alone.
Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

Stylistically, the show has drawn favorable comparisons to Quincy and The X-Files. The show's character gadgets and occasional usage of yet-to-be-invented technology has moved the show nominally into the genre of science fiction and garnered it with a 2004 Saturn Award nomination for best science fiction, fantasy, or horror television series.

The series is known for its unusual camera angles, percussive editing techniques, hi-tech gadgets, detailed technical discussion, and graphic portrayal of bullet trajectories, blood spray patterns, organ damage, methods of evidence recovery (e.g. fingerprints from the inside of latex gloves), and crime reconstructions. Many episodes feature lengthy scenes in which experiments, tests, or other technical work is portrayed in detail, usually with no sound except accompanying music — a technique reminiscent of Mission: Impossible. Often the lighting, composition, and mise-en-scene elements are heavily influenced by avant-garde film.

Although violence plays an important role in the series, in terms of the investigator's actual conduct the series is actually less violent than its immediate spin-off, CSI: Miami in that the Las Vegas investigators rarely use deadly force.Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, with no Front-Cover Texts, and with no Back-Cover Texts.
Virtual Magic is a human knowledge database blog. Text Based On Information From Wikipedia, Under The GNU Free Documentation License. Copyright (c) 2007 Virtual Magic. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.1 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts and no Back-Cover Texts. A copy of the license is included in the section entitled "GNU Free Documentation License".

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