Indoor Ski Slope



Indoor ski slopes are found in several countries, proving a climate controlled environment can be maintained in which snow can be manufactured using a snow cannon, enabling skiing to take place year-round.

The world's first indoor slope was Snowdome Adelaide, formerly known as Mt TheBarton, in Adelaide, Australia, which has since been removed due to running costs.

The world's largest indoor ski area is SnowWorld Landgraaf, totalling 35.000 m² of snow. This ski area opened in 2001 in Landgraaf, the Netherlands. In 2003, the first indoor snowboard FIS WorldCup contest was held in SnowWorld Landgraaf.


Countries with Indoor ski slope locations:

Belgium
China
Denmark
United Arab Emirates
Dubai
England
France
Germany
Netherlands
New Zealand
Scotland

Under Construction

* Germany
o Wittenburg - SnowFunPark
o Bispingen - Snowdome Sölden

* Belgium, Lessen - Lessines - Snow games

* England
o Manchester - Chill Factore

Proposed

* USA, New Jersey - Meadowlands Xanadu
* Ski in the U.A.E. in Ras al-Khaimah a 2000m slope is under consideration
* Ipswich, Suffolk, UK - SnOasis - 500m slope with 100m drop.
* Perth, Western Australia - West Coast Snowpark [2]
* Finland, Helsinki; SuperLife Lab - indoor ski and surf center
* Seoul, Korea, Ski Trac.
* A list of all of the indoor slopes proposed for the UK is available at TheBoarder.co.uk (external link)

Closed

* Australia, Adelaide - Snowdome Adelaide, formerly known as Mt TheBarton (Closed June 2005)
* Japan, Tokyo - SSAWS (Closed September 2002)Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, with no Front-Cover Texts, and with no Back-Cover Texts.
Virtual Magic is a human knowledge database blog. Text Based On Information From Wikipedia, Under The GNU Free Documentation License. Copyright (c) 2007 Virtual Magic. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.1 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts and no Back-Cover Texts. A copy of the license is included in the section entitled "GNU Free Documentation License".

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